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Rainy Day Woman #12 & 35

(„Blonde on Blonde”, 1966 Columbia)
słowa i muzyka: Bob Dylan
Well, they'll stone ya when you're trying to be so good,
They'll stone ya just a-like they said they would.
They'll stone ya when you're tryin' to go home.
Then they'll stone ya when you're there all alone.
But I would not feel so all alone,
Everybody must get stoned.

Well, they'll stone ya when you're walkin' 'long the street.
They'll stone ya when you're tryin' to keep your seat.
They'll stone ya when you're walkin' on the floor.
They'll stone ya when you're walkin' to the door.
But I would not feel so all alone,
Everybody must get stoned.

They'll stone ya when you're at the breakfast table.
They'll stone ya when you are young and able.
They'll stone ya when you're tryin' to make a buck.
They'll stone ya and then they'll say, „good luck.”
Tell ya what, I would not feel so all alone,
Everybody must get stoned.
 
Well, they'll stone you and say that it's the end.
Then they'll stone you and then they'll come back again.
They'll stone you when you're riding in your car.
They'll stone you when you're playing your guitar.
Yes, but I would not feel so all alone,
Everybody must get stoned.
 
Well, they'll stone you when you walk all alone.
They'll stone you when you are walking home.
They'll stone you and then say you are brave.
They'll stone you when you are set down in your grave.
But I would not feel so all alone,
Everybody must get stoned.
Rainy Day Women #12 & 35” is a song by Bob Dylan and the opening track of his 1966 album, Blonde on Blonde.
The song is notable for its unusual instrumentation, being the only song on Blonde On Blonde to feature a brass band, and the somewhat controversial „They'll stone ya” in every line of the verses, plus the refrain of „But I would not feel so all alone--everybody must get stoned!”. Robert Shelton's 1986 biography of Dylan No Direction Home (unrelated to the Martin Scorsese documentary No Direction Home), states that the song was banned by many American radio stations and the BBC, due to paranoia about „drug songs”.
The song is essentially a simple blues chord progression in the key of F. The parts played by the trombone, tuba, piano, bass, drums, and tambourine remain practically the same in all of the verses, but Dylan's harmonica playing and vocal performance are both wildly varied, and generally not in the same key as other instruments. There can also be heard much laughter and shouting in the background, mixed down to a low volume level, and Dylan himself laughs several times during his vocal delivery. The song sounds as if it is being played by musicians who are very high on marijuana, and that is possibly intentional. According to Howard Sounes' book Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan, Dylan refused to play the song „straight,” meaning sober, and large milkshake cartons of „Leprechaun Cocktails” (normally served in shot glasses) were brought in for the band to consume. Dylan did not touch the alcohol but was high on cannabis, having passed joints around before the recording.
The song reached #2 on the U.S. Pop Singles chart and #7 in the UK.
 

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